Jewish Prayer: How Yom Kippur Begins

From: My Jewish Learning <community>
Date: Tue, Oct 8, 2019 at 7:00 PM
Subject: Jewish Prayer: How Yom Kippur Begins
To: <lednichenkoolga>

Why does Yom Kippur start with this haunting prayer?
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Why Yom Kippur Begins

with Kol Nidrei

Every year, Jews around the world begin Yom Kippur with the solemn and haunting Kol Nidrei prayer, recited just before the sun sets. This ancient legal formula annuls all vows that will be made in the coming year. But this seems a confusing choice for the beginning of Yom Kippur. Why would Jews begin the Day of Atonement by negating promises they haven’t yet made?

UNDERSTAND KOL NIDREI

Prayer

Kol Nidrei Teaches the Power of Words

The old adage “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me" is actually the opposite of what this Yom Kippur service teaches us. Kol Nidrei shows that words have enormous power.

READ MORE

Prayer
Full Text of Kol Nidrei

Explore the full text of the Kol Nidrei prayer in Aramaic (it’s not Hebrew!), English translation, and transliteration.

READ IT NOW

Prayer
Prayer Services on Yom Kippur

Kol Nidrei lasts a few moments, but Yom Kippur prayers fill most of the 25 hour Day of Atonement. Learn more about the flow of Yom Kippur services.

EXPLORE YOM KIPPUR PRAYERS
Prayer has been the foundation of Jewish ritual and practice for thousands of years, but you may still wonder how and why to say the prayers in the canon. At My Jewish Learning, we invite you to explore the deeper side of prayer. Each week we’ll share a unique exploration of a particular Jewish prayer, plus offer background materials and more to enhance your understanding. In the meantime, you can explore all of MJL’s prayer resources here.

EXPLORE MORE PRAYER
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Someone just viewed: Fwd: Someone just viewed: Yom Kippur deals with something deeper than the casting of blame; it deals with the question of responsibility. On Yom Kippur, each of us conducts his/her own trial before God. This process is designed to be, an intensive and sincere internal investigation. With faith, humility, and hope, we submit to God our own findings about the extent of our responsibility. There is clearly a fundamental and substantive difference between the liberal Israeli legal system, which deals with guilt and innocence, and traditional Jewish law, which deals with responsibility that is not a function of guilt.

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ETHYMOLOGY : YOM KIPUR: According to Leviticus, the need for atonement on Yom Kippur is directly linked to the p recocious transgressions of Nadav and Avihu, the elder sons of Aaron the Priest, who provoked God by introducing a “fo reign fire” into the Holy of Holies and were torched by divine flamethrower in retribution. ::

The unique character of the original sin prompted Jewish sages to interpret the ambiguous wording of Leviticus, 16:30 – “For on this day shall atonement be made for you, to cleanse you; from all your sins shall ye be clean before the Lord” – as proof that atonement on Yom Kippur can only absolve offenses against God. Sins committed against fellow men and women require a direct apology, without which, according to hard-liners, God won’t forgive you anyway.

Nobel prize in physics awarded to cosmology and exoplanet researchers James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Que loz honoured for for ‘improving our understanding of evolution of universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos’ Hannah Devlin Science correspondent @hannahdev Tue 8 Oct 2019 11.33 BSTFirst published on Tue 8 Oct 2019 10.57 BST Shares 333 James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz are the 2019 Nobel laureates in physics. Photograph: Niklas Elmehed/Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Three scientists have been awarded the 2019 No bel prize in physics for groundbreaking discoveries about the evolution of the Universe and the Earth’s place within i t. The Canadian scientist James Peebles has been awarded half of the 9m Swedish kronor (£740,000) prize for his theoret ical discoveries about the evolution of the universe. A Swiss duo of astronomers, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, will s hare the other half of the prize for thei

Nobel prize in physics awarded to cosmology and exoplanet researchers

James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz honoured for for ‘improving our understanding of evolution of universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos’

Hannah Devlin Science correspondent

@hannahdev

Tue 8 Oct 2019 11.33 BSTFirst published on Tue 8 Oct 2019 10.57 BST

Shares
333

James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz
James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz are the 2019 Nobel laureates in physics. Photograph: Niklas Elmehed/Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Three scientists have been awarded the 2019 Nobel prize in physics for groundbreaking discoveries about the evolution of the Universe and the Earth’s place within it.

The Canadian scientist James Peebles has been awarded half of the 9m Swedish kronor (£740,000) prize for his theoretical discoveries about the evolution of the universe. A Swiss duo of astronomers, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, will share the other half of the prize for their discovery of the first planet beyond our solar system.

James Peebles was rewarded for laying a foundation for modern cosmology, including his realisation that the faint microwave radiation that filled the cosmos just 400,000 years after the Big Bang contains crucial clues to what the universe looked like at this primitive stage and how it has evolved over the subsequent 13bn years.

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Mayor and Queloz have been recognised for their joint discovery in 1995 of the first exoplanet 50 light years away in the constellation of Pegasus. The planet, 51 Pegasi b, is a gaseous ball about 150 times more massive than the Earth and with a scorching surface temperature of 1000C.

The discovery heralded a new era of astronomy, with astronomers having since found more than 4,000 exoplanets, with an incredible range of sizes, forms and orbits. Learning about these strange and varied world’s beyond our solar system has transformed our understanding of how planets formed and given new focus to the question of whether there could be alien life is out there somewhere.

Peebles is also credited with developing the theoretical tools that allowed scientists to perform a cosmic inventory of what the universe is made from, showing that ordinary matter makes up just 5% of its known contents, with the rest being dark matter and dark energy.

“We still must admit that the dark matter and dark energy are mysterious,” Peebles told the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on Tuesday. “There are still many open questions…What in the world is this dark matter?”

Looking back over his career spanning half a century, Peebles, who is Albert Einstein professor emeritus of science at Princeton University, said that he never set out with a grand plan. “I could think of one or two things to do in cosmology. I just did them and kept going,” he said. “The prizes and awards, they are charming, much appreciated, but that’s not part of your plans. You should enter science because you are fascinated by it.”

Prof Goran Hansson, secretary-general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences that chooses the laureates, said the three had made “contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe, and Earth’s place in the cosmos.”

Prof Sir Martin Rees, the astronomer Royal, described Peebles as the world’s “most
influential and respected leader of empirical cosmology with a sustained
record of achievement spanning half a century”.

“The study of exoplanets is perhaps the most vibrant field of astronomy. We
now know that most stars are orbited by retinues of planets; there may be a
billion planets in our galaxy resembling the Earth (similar in size and at
a distance from their parent star where liquid water can exist),” Rees added. “This takes us a step towards the fascinating question of detecting evidence for life
on the nearest of these exoplanets.”

On Monday, Americans William Kaelin and Gregg Semenza and Britain’s Peter Ratcliffe won the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine for discovering details of how the body’s cells sense and react to low oxygen levels, providing a foothold for developing new treatments for anaemia, cancer and other diseases.

The Nobel prize for chemistry will be announced on Wednesday, two literature prizes will be awarded on Thursday, and the peace prize comes on Friday. This year will see two literature prizes handed out because the one last year was suspended after a scandal rocked the Swedish Academy.

ends

MY YOM KIPUR – TO MRS POLINA LEDNICHENKO, ANDREI LEDNICHENKO, SASHA, LEDNICHANKO , BELKA AND MY MOM AND DAD : AND MY FASTING TODAY

HELLO ALL,

I HAVE TO REPENT FOR MY SINS. TO ALL OF U

THERE WERE TIMES WHEN I COULD HAVE BEEN MORE NOBLE, KINDER AND MORE UNDERSTANDING .. I REPENT IT ..

ASIDE FROM REPENTING – TO ME YOM KIPUR HAS A DEEPER MEANING: AS IT – TO ME – TRIGGERS SOMETHING INTERNAL.. AS REPENTING IS EXTERNAL.

TO ME YOM KIPUR HAS A DEEPER MEANING – A SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY.. WHICH I CARRY AND I HOPE TO CARRY IT WITTH OUTMOST EARNESTNESS ..

NOW, ON FASTING –

I WILL FAST TODAY – BUT ONLY FOR 24 HOURS – IS THE FASTING REQUIRED..

THE ONLY PROBLEM WITH FASTING IS – I CAN DEAL WITH NO FOOD FOR 24 HOURS, BUT I AM ADDICTED TO WATER – I DONT KNOW IF I WILL SURVIVE WITHOUT WATER – FOR 24 HOURS.. LAST YEAR, I FASTED BUT AFETR 12 OR 13 HOURS, I HAD TO DRINK..

MAYBE THIS YEAR WOULD BE DIFFERENT.. I CANT PROMISE.. BUT I WILL TRY .. FOOD IS NOT A PROBLEM FOR ME – ITS JUST WATER.. I DONT DRINK ANY CARBONATED, DRINKS – LIKE COKE OR PEPSI, ANYWAY, ITS JUST WATER – THAT I CANT DO WITHOUT

I HOPE I WILL MAKE IT ..

REGARDS

YOURS SINCERELY

AJAY