Welcome to Getting Comfortable in Synagogue

From: My Jewish Learning <community>
Date: Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 7:05 PM
Subject: Welcome to Getting Comfortable in Synagogue
To: <lednichenkoolga>

There is no single right way to enter Jewish prayer.
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Getting Comfortable in Synagogue

My Jewish Learning

Synagogue

Welcome!

Following a prayer service in synagogue can be difficult even for those who are comfortable with Hebrew and have experience attending services. It can be bewildering and dispiriting for those who can’t.

In this email series, we will guide you through what to expect when you go to synagogue, whether you’re stepping into a shul for the first time, or you’ve been before but need a refresher on the structure of the sanctuary and the prayers. We’ll delve more deeply into some of the most important prayers, describe common traditions and choreography, and explain the supplementary prayers and practices performed on Shabbat and the major Jewish holidays. It can feel like a lot, but there is a logic to it and we will give you the tools to learn it.

Beyond the mechanics, we will also be sharing some of the formulas, recitations and practices that Jewish tradition, both ancient and modern, offers to help orient the heart toward meaningful prayer. We’ll explore writings that offer new insights into ancient Jewish liturgy and the contemporary theology of prayer.

Synagogue Window
Why Pray?

All Jewish prayer is ultimately an effort to connect with something beyond the self, to create islands of time for self-reflection and to enable us to catch a glimmer of our truest selves.

That isn’t always easy to do, but these emails can help set the stage for it to happen.

GET STARTED
Ner Tamid
How to Find a Synagogue

Before you can get comfortable in a synagogue, you’ll need to find a synagogue that feels right to you (unless, of course, you’re attending synagogue for a bar or bat mitzvah or other special event). There are a few things to consider, among them the synagogue’s religious or theological orientation and what it offers congregants in terms of services. If you’re looking to formally join a synagogue as a member, you may want to consider asking some specific additional questions.

READ WHAT TO CONSIDER
Prayer Book
Getting Ready to Pray

Whatever synagogue you choose to attend, and whichever prayers you elect to recite, it is your kavanah — your intention — that matters most. So don’t immediately get too bogged down mastering the liturgy or figuring out when to stand or sit. And know too that there is no single right way to enter Jewish prayer — and there never has been.

UNDERSTAND YOUR INTENTION
Thanks again for joining My Jewish Learning on this journey to Getting Comfortable in Synagogue! Your next email will dive into the structure of a synagogue sanctuary, so you can feel comfortable in and knowledgable about the physical space you’re in. Stay tuned!

Your next email in My Jewish Learning’s Getting Comfortable in Synagogue series will arrive in a few days. Did someone forward this email to you? Sign up for your own copy of the email series here.

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Dive Deeper into Jewish Prayer

From: My Jewish Learning <community>
Date: Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 7:05 PM
Subject: Dive Deeper into Jewish Prayer
To: <lednichenkoolga>

Our new email series will guide you.
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Jewish Prayer

brought to you by

My Jewish Learning

Praying at Western Wall

Jewish woman praying at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

Welcome! Thank you for joining My Jewish Learning’s new email series that will dive deeper into Jewish prayers and prayer rituals.

Your first email will arrive soon. In the meantime, you can explore individual prayers, pronunciations, meanings, history, and much more on MyJewishLearning.com.

EXPLORE JEWISH PRAYER

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Forgiveness: More Than ‘I’m Sorry’

From: My Jewish Learning <community>
Date: Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 7:00 PM
Subject: Forgiveness: More Than ‘I’m Sorry’
To: <lednichenkoolga>

Plus, how to forgive yourself.
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Forgiving

Forgiving

Welcome to "Explore Forgiveness," a new 7-part email series from My Jewish Learning devoted to helping you prepare for Yom Kippur through contemporary examinations of the role of forgiveness in our lives. As you read, you can ask questions about forgiveness in our holidays discussion group.

After "I’m Sorry," The Real Work of Forgiveness

By Rabbi Rebecca Einstein Schorr

“I’m sorry.”

When we were kids, our parents taught us that that these two words were like a magic elixir. You stepped on your sister’s foot? Say you’re sorry. You ate the last cookie without permission? Say you’re sorry. You broke Mom’s vase while playing ball in the house? Say you’re sorry. Not so hard, right?

But it turns out that saying “I’m sorry” isn’t the same as seeking forgiveness.

LEARN THE DIFFERENCE

Forgiving

What Does Judaism Say About Forgiving Ourselves?

The Torah places a high value on self-love. That means practicing self-forgiveness, too, writes Rabbi Karen Kedar.

EXPLORE WHY

Forgiving

How Psalm 27 Can Help You Let Go of the "Ifs"

Everyone wishes we had "do-overs" for certain things we’ve done, or didn’t do. The psalm that many Jews say during the month of Elul, the month leading up to Rosh Hashanah, can help us create new opportunities, instead of mourning missed possibilities.

READ HOW

Forgiving

Your email series exploring contemporary views on forgiveness in Jewish life and tradition will continue in a few days.

Forgiving

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Forgiving

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Get Ready For the High Holidays

From: My Jewish Learning <community>
Date: Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 6:34 PM
Subject: Get Ready For the High Holidays
To: <lednichenkoolga>

The season for reflection and repentance begins today.
My Jewish Learning

Shofar - It's Elul!

Get Set for Elul!

This weekend is the start of Elul, the last month of the Jewish year. It’s a month of spiritual preparation for the High Holidays and a time of introspection. The self-examination during this period is known in Hebrew as cheshbon hanefesh — literally “an accounting of the soul.” How can you get the most out of Elul?

FIND OUT NOW

Apple

Four Unique Ways to Prepare for the High Holidays

Just click on the buttons to subscribe to any of the special email series below, and you’ll start receiving them in your inbox. You can unsubscribe at any time.

1. Get a Unique Guide to Holiday Prep

Sign up for our High Holidays Guide. This beautiful email series will guide you through all the holiday rituals, customs, vocabulary, and recipes that you need to know.

SIGN UP HERE
2. Take a Deeper Look at Forgiveness

Asking for forgiveness is one of the most important aspects of the High Holiday season. But what does forgiveness really mean? Is it always necessary? And how should we ask for forgiveness in the age of Facebook? Explore forgiveness with this original series.

SIGN UP HERE
3. Get Comfortable in Synagogue

Jewish prayer can take place anywhere at any time. But praying in community can be especially meaningful. Sign up for a unique email series that will guide you through navigating the synagogue experience, from learning the structure of a prayer service to making the prayers more meaningful.

SIGN UP HERE
4. Explore Jewish Prayer

Prayer is an essential component of the High Holidays, and there are many prayers unique to the season. In this ongoing series, we’ll take a deeper look at a particular Jewish prayer each week, including the special prayers during Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Learn what each prayer can mean to you.

SIGN UP HERE

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